Category Archives: Uncategorized

Is missing the ‘subject’ the point in news coverage of violent suppression of strikes?

“Cambodia garment workers’ strike turns deadly after police open fire”
This story’s headline reveals a lot about the nature of power structures in society if we consider some basic facts about the nature of news headlines in terms of syntax or the arrangement of and choice of words. If you read it straight through, you will notice that this sentence is written in the passive voice.

The initial implication of the structure or syntax is that the ‘Cambodia garment workers’ strike turns deadly’ because of the workers or their strike, not because of the police open fire. In fact, when you first read it, did you think perhaps the police open fire because the Cambodia garment workers’ strike turned deadly?
Certainly, that is one implication: the police are responding to a ‘deadly turn’ in the strike, something that is/was caused by the workers themselves (i.e. the strike) rather than by the police. This in turn implies that the three workers (and other striking workers) are responsible for their own (colleagues’) deaths.

But, ask yourself, ‘why did “Cambodia garment workers’ strike turns deadly”? Is it not because ‘police open fire’? If you read further into the news story, you will know that the police were armed with the AK-47 (i.e. automatic rifle). The striking workers were not armed.
Why not write the sentence like this (using almost all the exact same words): ‘ Cambodian police open deadly fire on striking garment workers’? This sentence makes it more clear as to the ‘subject-verb-action’ of the simple sentence and gives what is surely a more direct relationship between ’cause-and-effect’ – i.e. what happened – by putting the subject (‘police’) before the verb (‘open fire’) and the ‘object’ of ‘effect’.
Would this not be the better form of journalism whereby the ‘actors’ (i.e. police) or ‘subject’ (of the sentence) engaged in the ‘action’ (verb) on the ‘object’ (i.e. workers) so that it is clear. You should compare this to other forms of news coverage to get a sense of how news works to help construct a particular view of the world.

However, I would just point out that as we become accustomed to reading news in a particular fashion, we do not think consciously about these sorts of structures – even if you are a critical thinking individual engaged in the world around us. (There are many scholarly studies  of news coverage of protests from which I have drawn.) 

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“It’s a paradox that contract profs are amongst the lowest paid…”

Paradox of CAS professors

“It’s a paradox that contract profs are amongst the lowest paid professionals and yet they work for the very institution that promotes itself on teh basis of increasing the earning power of its graduates.”

I am re-publishing this in solidarity with adjuncts and supporters in the USA in their actions on National Adjunct Walkout Day (NAWD) on 25 Februrary 2015

It was originally: ‘A statement in support of Contract Academic Staff (CAS) (aka adjunct professors in the USA) during Fair Employment Week organized by the Canadian Association of University Teachers, 21-25 October 2013.’

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2013/10/21 · 8:18 am

Are these senators representative?

There are three aspects that I want to consider about the four Canadian senators who are under scrutiny at present over claims for allowances for second residences.

Do senators have any kind of ‘obligation’, ‘duty’ or ‘responsibility’ to the public?

‘Should’ senators have to pay back taxpayers’ money/public funds that they obtained via claims that turn out not to be true or valid? Do those who aspire to the highest public offices in the country demonstrate any kind of ‘obligation’ to the people who pay their salaries, pensions, benefits, perks? Obligation raises related terms such as duty and responsibility. Yet, the language of obligation, duty and responsibility, the ‘should’ as it were, only appears more archaic or obsolete when mentioned in the same sentence as the present government (it is not necessarily restricted to just one party, though the Conservative government appears to be especially resistant to such arguments).

‘Should’ there be a ‘penalty’?

The second aspect is raised by the respective Conservative and Liberal party leaders in Senate, who ‘represent’ two of Canada’s three largest parties, saying in their joint statement that their peers ‘should be required to repay immediately all monies … with interest’.

Returning money that does not belong to you cannot be a ‘penalty’ (i.e. a punishment) since you end up where you started — i.e. without money you didn’t have to begin with (although, perhaps, if you hadn’t been caught…).

The only ‘penalty’ raised here is the interest to be paid on the amount claimed. Will they be charged ‘credit card’ or ‘pay-day loan’ interest rates on the sums they obtained? That would definitely be a ‘penalty’ for most Canadians, but probably not for those so well connected to the corporate and political elites, would it?

These senators, if guilty, have betrayed the public’s trust and further instilled distrust of both the politicians that appointed them as well as Senate itself — and, indeed, of many other democratic institutions, even those unconnected to Senate.

A ‘penalty’ worthy of the meaning of punishment ‘should’ at least mean that the senator is stripped of his/her position, title, salary, benefits, pensions, the way that so many working Canadians in the private sector have been stripped of their jobs, pensions, salaries, wages and benefits because of the same political parties — to which these senators are affiliated — which, when in government, passed laws that enabled corporations to ransack pension plans and let CEOs get paid bonuses, even when their companies were declaring ‘bankruptcy’ (Nortel?). Shouldn’t senators be treated the same as everyone else? Or are they ‘above’ or ‘exempt’ from the law?

The third aspect that one should think about is whether Senate or senators are ‘representative’?

Even though they are ‘unelected’, I would suggest that these senators (all senators in fact) are ‘representative’. Of course, they are not ‘representative’ in terms of being elected by citizens voting in a democratic process. But, they are very much ‘representative’ of the values, attitudes, beliefs, idea(l)s, perspectives of those who appoint them. Indeed, they are representative of the political parties of which they are members, regardless of whether the party rejects them when they are under public scrutiny.

Otherwise, you should ask: ‘Why were they appointed in the first place?’

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The Assault on Universities: A Review

Is there a worse possible fate for Canadian universities than the imminent future bearing down on universities in the UK? A 100 per cent cut to teaching grants for the humanities and social sciences; tripling of tuition fees to £9,000; up to 40,000 jobs lost and 49 universities (out of 130) at risk of closure.

These developments, set to go into effect in fall 2012, will add to the problems facing universities in light of recent cuts of £1 billion and the ongoing sector marketization and privatization via reforms first introduced by New Labour. These processes include the real or perceived corruption of the academy via the pandering to donors, such as the scandal surrounding the £1.5 million donation from a charitable foundation run by Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of the late Libyan leader, to the London School of Economics.

Such changes will compound the decade-plus impact of research and teaching ‘assessments’ on universities that have led to the wholesale closures of departments, including traditional academic subjects such as biology and English, because of ‘mediocre’ or ‘poor’ performances in research or teaching or in attracting students.

The blind faith in market fundamentalism has evolved via the last 15 years of higher education policy into a ‘logic’ that means even a top performance rating will not guarantee your survival.

No story encapsulates this disastrous logic better than the closure of Middlesex University’s philosophy department and its flagship, world renowned Centre for Research into Modern European Philosophy in 2010, despite earning the highest performance research grade (5P). Middlesex will continue to collect £175,000 per year in additional funding for quality over the next four years.2

The arts and humanities dean’s justification for the closure was “… that, it made ‘no measurable contribution’ to the university” (p. 21) or, in other words, it “brought in a lower per capita income … and therefore seemed uneconomical.” (p. 23)

This logic, which can undermine even the most successful and prestigious of programs, is reflected in the “rise of McKinseyism, the doctrine that things that cannot be measured have no value.” (p. 21)


To read more of this review of The Assault on Universities: A Manifesto for Resistance, edited by Michael Bailey and Des Freedman, London: Pluto Press, 2011, please go to The CAUT Bulletin, Vol.59, no.5 (May 2012): [http://www.cautbulletin.ca/en_article.asp?SectionID=1405&SectionName=Bookshelf&VolID=342&VolumeName=No%205&VolumeStartDate=5/11/2012&EditionID=36&EditionName=Vol%2059&EditionStartDate=1/19/2012&ArticleID=3484]

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Filed under Canadian Universities, Cutbacks, Democracy, Economics, Education, Faculty Unions, Higher Education, Private Universities, Public Sector, Tuition, Uncategorized

Harper: Pensioners as ‘Threats’ to Economy? Reveals much about how work is ‘downgraded’

The comments that Prime Minister Stephen Harper made about the “threat” that Canadian elders represent to the economy and future of the country at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, should not have been unexpected.

Harper has never forsaken nor rejected his neoliberal beliefs and support for the corporate elite (who have been framed by the occupy movement as the “1%” [though they tend to be a much smaller group of closely linked people than this figure suggests], as opposed to the rest of us, the “99%”). For Harper and his ilk, what furthers the bottom line of private, for-profit corporations is of value. The people, though, who make a corporation or government or any other organization work, are not.

Perhaps, Harper has read too much of the “Great CEOs” of history. It’s not just Harper, though. So much in our corporate-owned and controlled media extol the virtues and values of the “great men of business” without a thought about the people who actually do the work. None of them would be worth their bonuses without us, the 99%, doing all the work.

This is the same as the Caterpillar lock-out of nearly 500 workers at the Electro-Motive Diesel Plant in London, Ontario, on 1 January 2012 because the executives wanted to cut their wages and benefits by more than 50%, even in spite of huge profits made by the company. This is how the members of Canadian Auto Workers Local 27 are rewarded for decades of hard work, increased productivity, skills and expertise?!

Just as Caterpillar appears to have little use or regard for the human beings that make the goods, so do Harper and the Conservatives show how little they value what retired workers have done for this country over the previous decades.

Yet, many of these hard-working Canadians have been ripped off by executives and governments. For example, provincial and federal governments allowed or even enabled executives to raid the pension funds of employees in the private sector, and now politicians, like Harper, turn around and complain that the public pension system is not sustainable. Or that public sector workers have pensions that will allow them to retire (modestly) and even that is somehow wrong.

This is part of the de-valuation or degradation of work and its value in society by the very elites that benefit from the work of the 99%.

It also explains Harper’s degradation of the work of our elders, people who have worked and followed the rules all their lives. They’ve struggled to build this country and worked hard.

I think it is worth (re)reading Bertolt Brecht’s poem from to get the perspective from the 99%:

“A Worker Reads History”

Who built the seven gates of Thebes?
The books are filled with names of kings.
Was it the kings who hauled the craggy blocks of stone?
And Babylon, so many times destroyed.
Who built the city up each time? In which of Lima’s houses,
That city glittering with gold, lived those who built it?
In the evening when the Chinese wall was finished
Where did the masons go? Imperial Rome
Is full of arcs of triumph. Who reared them up? Over whom
Did the Caesars triumph? Byzantium lives in song.
Were all her dwellings palaces? And even in Atlantis of the legend
The night the seas rushed in,
The drowning men still bellowed for their slaves.

Young Alexander conquered India.
He alone?
Caesar beat the Gauls.
Was there not even a cook in his army?
Phillip of Spain wept as his fleet
was sunk and destroyed. Were there no other tears?
Frederick the Great triumphed in the Seven Years War.
Who triumphed with him?

Each page a victory
At whose expense the victory ball?
Every ten years a great man,
Who paid the piper?

So many particulars.
So many questions.

(See this link to follow up some informative comments and thoughts on Brecht’s poem: http://wonderingminstrels.blogspot.com/2003/12/worker-reads-history-bertolt-brecht.html)

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