Should you (the 99%) pay for parties for the 1%?

Since 31 July 2011, the largest province of Canada, Ontario, has cut the ‘Special Diet Allowance’ of $250 for people on welfare. Welfare rates have been cut by 55% since the Progressive Conservative Party got into power in 1995.

As a result, people who have exhausted their unemployment benefits (E.I.) and their savings and are forced onto the dole, have very little to live on – even if they didn’t have to pay rent, it would hardly cover the rising cost of food, electricity, gas and so on. They represent the poorest of the 99%.

So, while the Liberals under Dalton McGuinty try to penalise the poor and the unfortunate, whom Tim Hudak’s Tories are probably itching to put the boot in as well, rich corporate executives and their wholly-owned political allies reap the benefit of taxpayer-funded parties (ie ‘entertainment allowances’). That is, the 1% get to party and we get the bill!

And poor people, who are trying to exist on incomes that are below subsistence in a first-world city (and provincial capital), Toronto, and have those meagre incomes cut even more, there is nothing forthcoming.

My modest proposal is that these ‘entertainment’ expenses that big business executives claim (at taxpayers’ expense) should be cut by 50% (as a starting point) and turned over to those most in need: the poor, the homeless, the unemployed (whose jobs have been shipped overseas), as well as putting it towards cutting student debt and funding daycare and long-term daycare. (I would also propose that this would not include small businesses and the self-employed under a certain level of turnover.)

Since the provincial election on 6 October 2011, where the Liberals were returned with a minority (53 seats), can we expect any change for those most in need? Although the Tories hold 37 seats, the New Democratic Party (NDP) holds 17. The anti-democratic rhetoric of both federal and provincial Tories has made McGuinty ‘nervous’ about anything that can be called a ‘coalition’ and so bends the way of Hudak and Harper.

This is unfortunate as the bankrupt model of neoliberalism continues to act as a ‘Robin Hood’ in reverse – putting money into the hands of those who need it least: the 1%. That is why today 15 October 2011 some of the 99% have awaken and taken to the streets of more than 950 cities around the world in over 80 countries.

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Filed under Corporate Welfare, Corruption, Cutbacks, Democracy, Economics, Elections, Politics, Poverty, Uncategorized, Wages, Welfare, Youth

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